Reports

Reports

The Mel King Institute report library houses research reports and policy briefs relevant to the community development sector from organizations all over the country.

  • Author: Urban Land Institute | Year: 2016
    Description:

    The report, Housing in the Evolving American Suburb, describes different kinds of suburbs based on the key factors that define and determine their housing markets. The report classifies and compares suburbs in the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States—shown in a searchable online map here—and assesses the key issues that will shape suburban residential demand and development in the years ahead.

    The report points out that healthy regions and fully functioning housing markets require a range of housing choices for households of different backgrounds, means, desires, and stages of life.

  • Author: Regional Housing Network of Massachusetts | Year: 2016
    Description:

    The Residential Assistance for Families in Transition program is one of the largest homelessness and eviction prevention programs in the commonwealth, stabilizing at-risk families before they enter the emergency shelter system. The program has proved to be effective, with a client return rate of 5 percent from 2015 and 2016: Of the 4,065 RAFT clients in FY 2016, 219 had sought RAFT aid in the prior fiscal year. This shows that the majority of clients use the aid to better their living situation without the need for more aid in the subsequent year. Because Massachusetts has the distinction of being the 7th most expensive place in the nation to rent an apartment, the RAFT program is needed now more than ever.

  • Author: Cheryl Young | Year: 2016
    Description:

    This report discusses the effects of low income housing in the least affordable markets.

  • Author: National Low Income Housing Coalition | Year: 2016
    Description:

    NLIHC's new report Housing Spotlight: The Long Wait for a Home about Housing Choice Vouchers (HCVs) and Public Housing waiting lists. An NLIHC survey of Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) indicated that 53% of HCV waiting lists were closed to new applicants and another 4% were open only to specific populations, such as homeless individuals and families, veterans, persons with a disability, or local residents. Sixty-five percent of closed HCV waiting lists had been closed for at least one year, more than half did not think the list would reopen within the next year, and wait times for HCVs often spanned years. The findings make clear that we must expand housing resources for our nation’s lowest income renters.