Reports

Reports

The Mel King Institute report library houses research reports and policy briefs relevant to the community development sector from organizations all over the country.

  • Author: Thomas Byrne, PhD; George Smart, LICSW | Year: 2017
    Description:

    A new study from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation and Pine Street Inn “demonstrates the importance of housing stability and case management as key determinants of health.”  Estimating Cost Reductions Associated with the Community Support Program for People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness found that every dollar spent on flexible support services for chronically homeless individuals in permanent supportive housing saved $1.61-$2.43 in health care costs.

  • Author: Keri-Nicole Dillman, PhD; CHAPA; DHCD; | Year: 2017
    Description:

    A new report, Strengthening Housing Investments for Community Revitalization: Research for Massachusetts Policy and Practice, concludes that enlisting affordable housing production as part of the revitalization of distressed neighborhoods ‘makes sense.’   Research from across the country demonstrates that producing Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) housing in high poverty neighborhoods positively impacts the immediate surrounding neighborhood – in terms of modest property value gains and increased safety. This paper provides recommendations to consider for sharpening goals and tools to advance community revitalization in Massachusetts, particularly through the Qualified Allocation Plan. 

  • Author: Department of Housing and Urban Development | Year: 2016
    Description:

    This report reviews the recent research on the causes and consequences of gentrification and identifies key steps policymakers can take to foster neighborhood change that is both inclusive and equitable. Best practices on the ground have been varied, but they all include a focus on the preservation and production of affordable housing and are strengthened by their collaboration and partnership with other local agencies. In particular, this report suggests four key strategies that could alleviate the pressures on housing affordability and community resistance to change.

  • Author: Dēmos and the Institute for Assets and Social Policy | Year: 2017
    Description:

    The Institute for Assets & Social Policy (IASP) at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management and Demos released a new report that explores popular explanations for the racial wealth gap between African-American, Latino, and white households. The report demonstrates that changing individual behavior in areas such as education, family structure, full- or part-time employment, and personal consumption habits would not reverse the economic harm done by structural racism. The investigation highlights that the ongoing structural barriers to wealth equality in the U.S. cannot be combated at the individual or household level. Instead, public policy is needed to eliminate racial wealth disparities.